Robot News

How exactly does one orchestrate the movements of a welding robot arm, welding torch, and positioner? What about adjusting wire feeders, power sources and inputting multiple welding commands? With RobotWorx' free customer training, welding robot programming doesn't have to remain a mystery. We offer one-on-one training to all our robotic welding system customers.

Robotic automation is becoming more and more prevalent in every area of manufacturing, and one of the things companies have realized is that no matter how much you read and study about robotics during your education, there is no substitute hands-on training.

View Entire Article

Everyone has heard that robotic welding can increase your production numbers from the enhanced speed that a robot provides during the application. However, that is not the only way a robot increasing your production numbers, and it is not the only way that a welding robot can boost your productivity. First off, you have to choose the right robot, the right power source, the right welding gun, and the right controller.

View Entire Article

A term like “lean manufacturing” may make you think of someone who is running a bare bones operation, and in a way, that is exactly what it means. By making your manufacturing leaner, you are “cutting out the fat,” which means you are getting rid of processes that are not necessary to your production process.

View Entire Article

Incorporating a welding cell into your production line is one of the best ways to keep your line functional, while also being effective and productive. Usually a welding cell consists of one or more robots, end-of-arm tooling, a safety package of some kind, and a positioner. The positioner is the part of the welding cell that brings work pieces into the robot’s work area and takes them out again.

View Entire Article

Most people purchase welding robots to weld products for their companies, because they know that the robots will increase their production line’s productivity. However, there are those who have purchased welding robots for more creative, artistic purposes. These researchers are teaching welding robots to paint and write, giving them the ability to create works that were once thought to be fueled solely by human emotion.

View Entire Article

Welding is the process of joining two pieces metal work pieces together using molten metal as a binding agent. Assembly is the process of constructing a product, sometimes in one place, but more often than not, while moving down a line where many workers perform one job at a time. Sometimes, you have to weld work pieces as part of the assembly process – meaning that welding and assembly go hand in hand.

View Entire Article

Welding has been a staple of the aerospace for many years. However, whether a piece was welded or riveted, it was almost completely done manually. The aerospace industry is one of the last transportation industries to get on board with robotic welding. Unlike the automobile industry, which adapted to robotic welding in the 1980s, industrial automated welding for the aerospace industry is a much more recent adaptation.

View Entire Article

When people think about welding, KUKA may be one of the first names they think of because it has been around so long. KUKA has been in the welding business for over 100 years, so it makes sense that they would eventually transfer that knowledge to the robotics industry. The history of KUKA welding robots is one that is over 40 years old, but it is a rich history indeed. In 1971, KUKA became the first company to incorporate robots into a welding system.

View Entire Article

In the 1960s, the Unimate robot introduced robotic welding to the world. By the 1970s, several companies, including Motoman Robotics, were beginning to develop their own version of the welding robot. The history of Motoman welding robots is rich and filled with several models and innovations that have continued to improve over these last 30+ years. The first Motoman robotic welder was introduced to the world in 1977. This robot was called the Motoman-L10.

View Entire Article

Welding small parts has always been a challenge for manufacturers, whether they are using human welders or robotic welders. FANUC has taken on the task of building a great pulsed MIG welding robot that will be able to not only weld small parts, but also be able to do it cleaner than other robots on the market today, by having an application that is almost spatter-free.

View Entire Article

RobotWorx

370 W. Fairground St.
Marion, OH 43302

phone: 740-251-4288
fax: 740-383-3939

Copyright © 2013 Welding-Robots.com All Rights Reserved.